Business

Good Buys says hello on Bay Street

Kaitlin Strohschein/Staff photos Several vendors had their stalls set up at Good Buys before the official opening Friday. The business unofficially opened this week to passersby, and the owners said they were welcome to start shopping before all the displays were ready.      - Kaitlin Strohschein/Staff photo
Kaitlin Strohschein/Staff photos Several vendors had their stalls set up at Good Buys before the official opening Friday. The business unofficially opened this week to passersby, and the owners said they were welcome to start shopping before all the displays were ready.
— image credit: Kaitlin Strohschein/Staff photo

Denise Garcia and Kellyn Hixon have a three-part strategy for making money at Good Buys, the Bay Street shop they’re opening today.

They’ll rent space to vendors, charge commission on vendors’ sales and sell products at the shop.

“We have a variety of vendors — some sell lavender products, some are collectors, some sell furniture,” Garcia said. “My main thing is, I want everything orderly and clean.”

Vendors can choose the size of the space to rent that seems most appropriate for the product they’re selling, and Hixon and Garcia plan to charge $2.25 per square foot per month for rent. An average space is 8 feet by 6 feet and costs $108 per month.

Garcia and Hixon also take a 10 percent commission fee, although they don’t charge for the credit card fees they pay with each sale.

“(The vendors) maintain their space, in the sense, by bringing in their product,” Garcia said. “We take care of the money-exchange side of things. It’s a venue for vendors to be little store owners and merchandisers.”

Susan Baker, who started Sue’s Lavender last August, plans to rent a space at Good Buys mainly to get exposure for the products she makes from lavender grown in her own yard.

“We do several of our farmers markets, but they’re getting ready to end,” she said. “This is a way to keep us going in the wintertime — to keep some of the income coming.”

Garcia and Hixon also plan to use some of the space at the shop to sell products they bought or made.

Garcia plans to sell antiques and vintage household items.

“I like the vintage area, because it’s kind of goofy,” she said. “I love the colors.

“I love ... everything that outfits a vintage house.”

She also likes “the Little House on the Prairie days,” she says, where the houses were “raw,” and builders built “from the ground up.”

Garcia says that she tries

not to be too greedy with her prices, and she encourages her vendors to take the same approach.

“The old saying is, ‘buy low, sell high,’ ” she said. “My motto is ‘buy low, sell fair.’ ”

The customers are smart enough to know whether or not they’re getting a good deal, she said, so it’s important to price the items reasonably.

Garcia hopes that people of all different income levels feel comfortable at her shop.

“I don’t want anyone down-and-out to not feel like they can come here,” she said, “and I want people in the higher income bracket to be able to come in and find something, too.”

Good customer service is also valued, she said.

“You have to love people,” she said. “If you look at an individual, a customer coming through that door, and all you see is a dollar sign, you’re in the wrong business."

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