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Kitsap Community Resources opens new facility in Port Orchard

AmeriCorps volunteer Camille Vinson works in one of the computer labs on the second floor of the new Kitsap Community Resources facility near the intersection of Jackson and Lund. - Chris Chancellor/Staff Photo
AmeriCorps volunteer Camille Vinson works in one of the computer labs on the second floor of the new Kitsap Community Resources facility near the intersection of Jackson and Lund.
— image credit: Chris Chancellor/Staff Photo

Kitsap Community Resources has a new home in South Kitsap.

The two-story, 6,900-square foot facility near the intersection of Jackson and Lund opened earlier this month.

"It is the culmination of a five-year vision to do this," Kitsap Community Resources executive director Larry Eyer said. "I'm pleased it came out well."

KCR, a Bremerton-based nonprofit, long as has operated a 5,500-square-foot satellite office at 1211 Bay Street. Eugenie Jones, who works in community relations for KCR, said the new facility allows them to streamline services.

"The idea for that facility is to provide the same services we have in Bremerton," she said.

In addition to some of KCR's staple programs, such as WIC, health care, housing assistance, literacy programs in ESL and GED preparation, and veterans assistance, there also is a computer lab. Eyer said that will be used to train adults in technology and the job-search process.

Eyer said that could not be accomplished at the rented satellite office because of its layout. KCR renovated the building, which formerly housed a video store, but Eyer said there still "were shortcomings with the facility."

"Having a new building designated toward services creates a lot of efficiency," he said, adding that it should be less expensive to operate than the previous location because it has earned Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification.

That includes finances. The building was designed by Winslow Architects of Bainbridge Island. Another Bainbridge Island company, Fairbank Construction, was the general contractor on the $2.5 million project.

"We will own the building without debt service," said Eyer, adding that a number of businesses and citizens contributed to the project. "I feel grateful to everyone who has contributed to this. It really was a broad-based community effort."

With the first phase of the project completed, Eyer already is thinking ahead to the next step on the 2.2-acre site. That will include the construction on 10 units to provide long-term affordable housing for KCR clients. Eyer said KCR has an application in for a grant through the state's housing trust fund. He said he is "optimistic" that will be granted, which could allow construction to begin early in 2013 with the structures completed one year later.

 

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