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Port Orchard deputy received Medal of Valor in Walmart shooting

Kitsap County Deputy Krista McDonald (center) with a Medal of Valor during a White House ceremony on Feb. 20 in Washington, D.C. Pictured with McDonald is U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and Vice President Joe Biden. - Courtesy Photo
Kitsap County Deputy Krista McDonald (center) with a Medal of Valor during a White House ceremony on Feb. 20 in Washington, D.C. Pictured with McDonald is U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and Vice President Joe Biden.
— image credit: Courtesy Photo

Vice President Joe Biden presented Kitsap County Deputy Krista McDonald with a Medal of Valor during a White House ceremony on Feb. 20 in Washington, D.C.

The Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor, authorized by the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Act of 2001, is the highest national award for valor by a public safety officer. The medal is awarded to public safety officers who have exhibited exceptional courage, regardless of personal safety, in the attempt to save or protect human life. Including this week’s awardees, a total of 78 medals have been presented since the first recipients were honored in 2003.

To receive the Medal of Valor, public safety officers must be nominated by the chief executive officer of their employing agencies, recommended by the bipartisan Medal of Valor Review Board, and cited by the U.S. Attorney General.

Kitsap County Sheriff Steve Boyer also attended the ceremony.

McDonald was recognized for her efforts in a Jan. 23, 2011, shooting incident at the Walmart store in Port Orchard in which two deputies were wounded.

Deputies John Stacy and Andrew Ejde responded to a report of a possibly armed male, accompanied by an underage female who was reported as missing from Utah and a runaway. The suspect was later identified as Anthony A. Martinez, 31, of Salt Lake City.

Stacy and Ejde approached man and his 13-year-old companion as they sat outside the entrance of Walmart. These deputies were assisted by McDonald, who had responded as an additional back-up

The man refused to identify himself and attempted to run from the location.

Stacy tried to grab the man, but missed and fell, and Ejde chased after the man as he attempted to run across the street and into the parking lot. Halfway across the street, the man drew a semi-automatic handgun hidden on his person, turned and fired multiple shots. Ejde was struck in the left shoulder and right arm, and went down into a raised flowerbed.

By this time, Stacy had regained his footing and was running after the armed man. The man shot and wounded Stacy in the right shoulder, who then fell to the asphalt.

McDonald began firing at suspect from her position at her patrol vehicle, approximately 100 feet away distance. The man then directed his attention toward McDonald as she started to move toward her two downed colleagues. The man continued to shoot at McDonald and Ejde.

Without protective cover, McDonald advanced toward the man and continued to return fire. One of her shots hit the man in the left leg and he dropped to the pavement, but he continued to fire on the deputies.

McDonald moved in on the man. The 13-year-old girl ran to the injured man. As she approached, the man shot and mortally wounded her. Moments later, the man turned his handgun on himself and committed suicide.

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