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Seattle murder victim a South Kitsap native

Today, the family she left in Port Orchard to seek independence in Seattle will bury RaeAnn Champaco, who was found stabbed to death in a bathroom outside the Washington State Convention Center Jan. 18.

Champaco, 30, graduated from South Kitsap High School in 1990. Much of her family, including parents Ramon and Lourdes Champaco, live in the Port Orchard area. RaeAnn at the time of her death, was living at the YWCA in Seattle.

So far, police only have one possible lead in Champaco’s death. Her ex-fiance, Larry William Dorsey, has been identified as a “person of interest” and is currently being sought by police for questioning.

Dorsey, 48, is also being sought by Seattle Police and the Kitsap County Sheriffs Department for criminal charges. In Seattle, he is wanted as a suspect in an unrelated stabbing in Seattle’s Occidental Park in November. In Kitsap County, he is wanted on a charge of third-degree assault.

According to court documents, Dorsey assaulted Champaco Dec. 6 at his aunt’s house on Sunnyslope Road. He allegedly beat her using his fists and a miniature baseball bat.

Champaco ran, severely bruised and distraught, to a neighbor’s house for help. Because she is deaf and has trouble communicating orally, she handed the neighbor a written note which explained she had been beaten up. The neighbor then called police.

After giving a written statement, Champaco was transported to Harborview Medical Center and treated for her injuries.

“There was more than enough to press charges, based on her injuries alone,” said Doug Dillard, the Sheriff’s Department detective assigned to the case.

Dorsey could not be located afterward. Following Champaco’s murder, the prosecutor’s office requested — and received — a nationwide warrant for his arrest and $500,000 bail. The unusually high bail is partly due to Dorsey’s criminal history — he was previously convicted in California of assault, murder, multiple robberies and a drive-by shooting.

“When it’s a nationwide warrant, it would mean they would extradite from anywhere in the country,” said Deputy Prosecutor Chris Casad. “Depending on the crime, there may be some limitations (otherwise).”

Champaco’s family changed phone numbers after the assault because they are afraid Dorsey will come after them.

“I don’t really want to talk to anyone right now because my family and I are fearful of retaliation,” said Ramon Champaco, RaeAnn’s father.

Dillard said sheriffs deputies have been issued a flyer on Dorsey, and have been warned to approach him with caution. He said, based on Dorsey’s past, there’s probably a lot he has done in the meantime that police don’t yet know about.

Dillard said RaeAnn Champaco met Dorsey while he was a pastor at one of the Seattle homeless shelters. He said Dorsey’s presence as a religious figure is more a cause for concern than relief within the department.

“These people that prey on the homeless, that’s one way of getting in,” Dillard said. “Anyone can call themselves a preacher these days. I would definitely say he’s not someone you’d want to turn your back on.”

Duane Fish, Seattle Police Department spokesman, said RaeAnn Champaco also filed a telephone harassment complaint against Dorsey three days before she was found murdered. In the report, Champaco said Dorsey threatened her family during the call.

Witnesses who found Champaco’s body also saw a well-dressed middle-aged man in a London Fog-style raincoat who started running north when the witnesses called for help. The witnesses believe the man was caucasian, but could not see much else because the man held the raincoat over his head.

Dorsey, who police say has a reputation with his friends for being well-dressed, is black.

“We’re not looking for vengeance against whoever did this,” Ramon Champaco said. “We’re at peace. The response from everyone has been just tremendous and we’re very grateful.”

Anyone with information relating to Dorsey should call the Kitsap County Sheriffs Office at: 337-7145. Anyone with information on Champaco’s murder should call the Seattle Police Department at: 206-625-5011.

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