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Port Orchard man charged in Bremerton bank robbery

Surveillance at the East Bremerton Chase Bank branch shows Jimi M. Sage during the robbery Oct. 29. He was charged with first-degree robbery and remains in jail on $50,000 bail.   - Courtesy photo
Surveillance at the East Bremerton Chase Bank branch shows Jimi M. Sage during the robbery Oct. 29. He was charged with first-degree robbery and remains in jail on $50,000 bail.
— image credit: Courtesy photo

A Port Orchard man was charged Monday with robbing a Chase Bank branch in East Bremerton, according to Kitsap County Superior Court documents.

Jimi M. Sage, 53, was charged with first-degree robbery and remains in jail on $50,000 bail.

Sage allegedly entered the Chase Bank branch inside Fred Meyer on State Highway 303 around 12:45 p.m. Oct. 29 and handed a note to a teller that read, “I’ve got a gun this is a robbery hand over all cash,” according to court documents.

The bank teller handed over nearly $2,000 in cash. Sage took the money and left the bank on foot.

Sage lives at an adult family home in Port Orchard and his legal guardian called 911 Oct. 30 reporting she just found nearly $2,000 in Sage’s dresser, court documents state.

A sheriff’s deputy showed his legal guardian a bank surveillance photo of the robbery suspect and she confirmed it was Sage.

When detectives went to the adult family home to interview him, Sage told them he knew they were there because of the money and he was expecting them. He told deputies he took a Kitsap Mental Health Services shuttle to a group therapy meeting in Bremerton and, after the meeting, he walked to the bank to rob it, according to court documents. Once he robbed the bank, Sage took the shuttle back to his home.

Sage told detectives he robbed the bank because he needed money to buy a guitar.

Detectives searched Sage’s room and found the clothing allegedly worn during the robbery and a letter Sage was writing to his roommate admitting to robbing the bank, court documents state.

Sage said he did not spend any of the money from the robbery and admitted “what he did was wrong and said it was a dumb thing to do,” court documents state.

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